• Jennifer Schubring

Who likes Slop?

Wow, I can't believe it's been a month since I posted the Pete The Cat instructional slides. I thought I'd be able to pump out at least one of these per week, but things have been way busier than I ever imagined. I've had bits and pieces of this done for almost a month, but pulling everything together and writing this post took me forever.


A few thoughts...

  1. You CAN do this, too!

  2. You DO NOT need to create a full slide deck like this immediately.

  3. Start a new presentation, and if you are doing synchronous or asynchronous learning add a few slides every few days or every week. By the end of the month you'll have a beautiful slide deck with videos, resources, and activities added in.

  4. The schedule for learning may be right for some, but not everyone. The important part is that we're incorporating other pieces of learning so that we are engaging learners in more than auditory comprehension or listening to the story, This slide deck works on vocabulary, writing, math, science, etc. Some learners may be able to complete a learning task faster than others. Be mindful that caregivers may be helping siblings, working themselves, and some learners may be resistant to learning at home. Allow families flexibility and grace as we all navigate this new world of home learning. It is okay if our learners are not completing work as quickly as they did at school. So, remember the schedule may work for some students, but not all. Create a schedule that is "just right" for your learner. If these activities aren't right for your learner, then supplement with other activities that fit their goals/objectives.

  5. The permissions for sharing are set the way they are for a reason. You may share the slide deck, but not alter it by making a copy. I have made all of this content free, but I do appreciate the recognition that it is my work, even the mistakes you may find in the deck, and the traffic to my website. I also do not want it altered, and then still have my name associated with it. Although I'm sure 99% of the alternations would be amazing, they would not be my work, and it would be unfair for someone to think that it was me that created the addition. I also would not be able to vet anything added, which, again, would make it look like it was my work. If you want to use bits and pieces, simply direct the learner to the slides that are pertinent to him/her. If you would like to read the story, share your version with the learner directly and have them complete the other slides. (Personalization is wonderful, but I understand that we don't all have the knowledge, tools, or time to record ourselves reading, etc.) I have included a PDF that can be printed or emailed, too. If you are using the PDF see if your PDF reader has annotate features. I use Adobe and it's an easy way to make this into worksheets. You can save the annotations and keep working through the slides or if you're using it with multiple learners just close the document without saving.

  6. If you're presenting synchonously in telepractice or doing virtual instruction you can make the slides interactive in several ways. There is also a link to a "I Really Like Slop!" Jamboard. If you make a copy of the Jam and share with your student who also opens it, you can both manipulate the items in the Jam and see what each other is doing live. You can also model AAC in the same way. See the blog post about Jamboard to learn more about it and see how it can work interactively. Alternatively, if you're in Zoom you may also screen share the slides or Jamboard and if you have the annotation feature turned on in your settings, the student will be able to use the annotation tools to draw/write on whatever you're presenting. Here are directions on that!


I hope you all enjoy "I Really Like Slop" by Mo Willems and adapted for distance learning by me, Jennifer Schubring, M.S., CCC-SLP!



Here is the printable PDF version.


Happy Learning! Jennifer


  • Building AAC

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